Perfection, Pulling it Together, and Plural Pastimes: this week on Best of SNO

It’s almost spring, and that makes it hard to concentrate on pretty much anything. But Best of SNO submissions are killer lately, and they’re really giving the extra sun a run for it’s money. This week, Adler Bowman profiles a peer who has struggled with an eating disorder, a Peninsula High student has his pick of colleges after pulling his life together, and Ethan McGee discusses the risks of athlete over-specialization. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

Starving for perfection – Adler Bowman, Kirkwood High School
“Every single time I stepped on the scale it felt like an accomplishment.”

From Suspended to Accepted: Tacoda Anker is College-Bound – Natalie Svinth, Peninsula High School
“Anker came from a place of calling suspension “free vacation” to being a semester away from earning all the credits he needs to graduate.”

Is over-specializing overdoing? – Ethan McGee, Bellwood-Antis High School
“Specializing athletes put so much effort into their sport every day that they often become tired of the work they’ve put in.”

Seniors enter business world with entrepreneurial endeavors – Roba Abousaway, Cinco Ranch High School
“I believe that I am able to accomplish anything I set my mind to, but I sometimes become apathetic about the company which leads to a reduction in sales.”

Ohio Education Board President visits Mayfield Schools – Alex Tramontano, Mayfield High School
“Ultimately, at the end of the day, we have to react and we have to change our course per the legislatures of what bills come out of there and how they direct us to what our most important thing is.”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Kids in Need, Taking a Stand, and Crossing Countries: this week on Best of SNO

It’s nearly spring, can you believe it? We can’t, but we’ve been buried under mountains of excellent Best of SNO submissions (which is not a bad place to be). This week, Davis McCool addresses the problem of homelessness among students in his district, Lawrence High deals with an offensive banner, and Zoee Rogers profiles a new math teacher with a solid case of wanderlust. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

School district identifies dozens of homeless students in need – Davis McCool, Oxford High School
“I think it starts off with awareness not to have on blinders and get caught in our little bubbles where everything is fine for us,” Roberson said. “There’s not a single person out there who doesn’t want to be loved.”

Shawnee Mission North banner removed from gym – Meredith Chapple, Lawrence High School
“When we have the opportunity to control things and it puts kids in a place where they feel some trust and some respect by their own school, then we’ve got to try to do that.”

Crossing countries, expanding minds – Zoee Rogers, Little Cypress-Mauriceville High School
“If you are willing to be open to new experiences and new adventures, then there is a whole wonderful world out there just waiting for you.”

Proctor inspires and finds love in art – Andi Fox, Harrisonburg High School
“People fascinate me. I like how we all have noses and eyes and teeth, but they are all different.”

Nashville Actors, Robert Kiefer and Carol Ponder, Perform ‘My Father’s War’ to Central Students – Zeena Whayeb, Chattanooga Central High School
“We have performed this play more than 150 times. So the hard thing is, how do I make it new every time?”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Positive People, Personal Evolution, and Protests: this week on Best of SNO

January took pretty much forever to get through, but it’s almost the middle of February already and time is flying! Best of SNO submissions are on fire, so we’ve got reading material to carry us all the way into spring, and that’s awesome. This week, Connor Lin profiles an inspiring teacher, Alex Ellison tells his story to a Sacramento Country Day School reporter, and Sophie Penn captures the scene at a local travel ban protest. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

History teacher awarded for social justice work – Connor Lin, Carlmont High School
“I am continually surrounded by people who inspire me, motivate me, teach me, and push me into new challenges in the work that I am being acknowledged for.”

From Anna Ellison to Alex Ellison: Alumnus explains his transition from a female to a male – Nicole Wolkov, Sacramento Country Day School
“I always wanted to be ‘one of the guys,’ whatever that means,” he said.

Protesters and lawyers show support at SFO – Sophie Penn, Carlmont High School
Check out Sophie Penn video report on a local travel ban protest.

The affected – Katie Judd, Kirkwood High School
“The worst part of it is that you know you aren’t going to die because that’s just how it feels, and all you want is for it to end and your mind is screaming at you to just use one more time.”

Tautology Club bonds over one quirky interest – Manar Ansari, St. John’s School
“If it sounds repetitively redundant, you’re on the right track.”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Driving Bus, Marching On, and Stopping Bullies: this week on Best of SNO

It’s basically the middle of winter, which means that engaging reading material is totally at a premium right now, so we’re pretty happy with Best of SNO submissions. This week, Cat Oriel profiles bus driver An’twon Colvin, Marywood and Southern Illinois University students discuss the epic Women’s March, and an Akins High student looks at legislation on cyber-bullying. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

‘Bus driving saved me:’ An’twon Colvin’s road to happiness – Cat Oriel, The Archer School for Girls
“I’ve seen my friends, I’ve seen them go down the wrong path, so I just took a different route.”

Carbondale women’s march draws hundreds in a show of equality, solidarity – Marnie Leonard, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
“I was in Washington in 1963 for the civil rights march,” said Greenfield, who has lived in the area since 1968. “I certainly didn’t think I would be doing this again 50 years later.”

Women’s March on Washington draws half a million people – Bethany Wade, Marywood University
“I think it will be something around for history to talk about for such a long time to come and that it’s important for people to see we’re here, willing to fight for our rights.”

Bill would enact stiff penalties on cyberbullies – Bethany Bissell, Akins High School
“It’s become such a problem, and they wanted to honor David by naming the law after him.”

‘I’m not just a minority – I’m a Muslim American’ – Hannah Ortega, Lovejoy High School
“I learned to accept the jeers and the negativity,” Syed said. “When people do that, I learned to say to myself, ‘Well they don’t know me.’”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Best of SNO Call for Submissions: Women’s March

We’ve had a big week. The US got a new president, we learned about “alternative facts” and Dippin’ Dots, and probably the biggest thing? The Women’s March on Washington and similar protests around the world. In fact, Saturday’s march may have been the biggest protest in American history. And we’re willing to bet that some of those on the scene were student journalists, there to report on the events.

Were your students there? Send us their best stories, images and videos. We can’t wait to see and feature them on Best of SNO.

Pro tip: we’re looking for local stories. We want to know what it was like to be on the scene, reporting history. Send us that story.

Finsta, Finding a New Name, and Friends to the End: this week on Best of SNO

Maybe it’s the increase in daylight these days (we’ll take every minute of it) but Best of SNO submissions have been delightful and intriguing. This week, Hannah Jannol tells all about a new social media trend, “Finsta,” Chinese students at Sacramento Country Day School discuss choosing their English names, and Meherina Khan makes a thoughtful and touching tribute to her hijab. Read on for our weekly pics, written and submitted by students just like yours.

REALITY CHECK: So-called ‘finsta’ accounts bring a different view of teen life to Instagram – Hannah Jannol, Shalhevet High School
“This is all the stuff I want to post but because it’s not acceptable or it’s not like what everyone else is posting, I don’t post it to my main. But I can put it on my finsta.”

Choosing new English names no big deal for Chinese international students – Mohini Rye, Sacramento Country Day School
“Surprisingly, most of the Chinese students treated their English names nonchalantly.”

Personal Column: Hijab and me – Meherina Khan, Cinco Ranch High School
“I became a student journalist with a voice—not only for myself, but for people of all different races, faiths, ethnicities, and sexualities who are looked down upon for being different. Hijab helped me convey my moods and convictions.”

Spirit of late student lives on through foundation – Rachel Powell, Pascack Valley High School
“We take our lives for granted. We get to do things every day that we want to do and other people don’t have that opportunity,”

PSEO – not always a fairytale ending – Miranda Felton, Cannon Falls High School
“This stress, I feel, not only took away from the quality of my education, but the experience of senior year.”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Conversion Therapy, Cancer, and Cards for a Cause: this week on Best of SNO

Oh man, it’s tough to say why (maybe it’s lack of sun, maybe it’s the fact that it’s the middle of January, maybe (we like this one) it’s the stiff competition for the SNO Distinguished Sites Excellence in Writing badge) but Best of SNO submissions got real. This week, Izza Choudry tackled the controversial topic of conversion therapy, a student at Pearl Sun shares three stories of classmates battling cancer, and a student at Cinco Ranch High gives back, in a different way. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

The Harsh Truth About Conversion Therapy – Izza Choudhry, Southern Lehigh High School
“In truth, [conversion therapy accomplishes] not much of anything,” Mrs. Tocci said. “Its existence only seems to strike fear and to support the notion that orientation is a choice that can be changed.”

Battling Cancer: Three students share journeys – Pearl Sun, Walt Whitman High School
“You never know what people have going on, so don’t assume anything,” Matthews said. “Even though people who go through this experience might look or seem different, they’re still the same person.”

Cards for a cause  – Joanne Chavali, Cinco Ranch High School
“I felt really guilty being both Muslim and in America because I wasn’t doing anything. I know there are things people do like protests, but I felt like that wasn’t doing anything personal for the people.”

‘This made his entire senior year’ – Ali Wagner, Bellwood-Antis High School
“Brandon is not just a senior that rarely gets his chance in varsity games, but one who lives with with autism.”

From undocumented to citizenship – Harley Quinn Smith, The Archer School for Girls
“Gomez has a message for Donald Trump: ‘We want to work, but we can’t work if you don’t give us the opportunity to,’ she said. ‘I hope he can change his mind.’”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

One more thing:  We now have Best of SNO plaques!

Photography, Assessing the Test, and Going Mobile: the week on Best of SNO

Everybody made it through winter break ok, right? Good. We did, too. Actually, time flew by because we had some great reading material. This week on Best of SNO, students at Shalhevet take art to the community in the form of disposable cameras, Yuri-Grace Ohashi discusses the current state of testing in schools, and City High goes mobile with one-to-one Chromebooks. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

Student project gives homeless a chance to show their world – Ma’ayan Waldman, Shalhevet High School
“Titled “Exposure,” Rosie and Maia’s project aims to empower homeless people in Los Angeles by providing them with a creative outlet – disposable cameras – to capture unique moments in their lives.”

Putting assessments to the test  – Yuri-Grace Ohashi, Starr’s Mill High School
“We’ve had some changes in the number [of mandatory tests], which, I believe, have benefited students and teachers by reducing the amount of tests that they must take.”

One-to-One: One Step Forward or One Step Back? – Victor Kalil, Iowa City High School
“Although only 39% of students surveyed think that this move will show a positive effect on their classes, approximately 60% of those surveyed think that this is a step forward.”

Using phones while walking: Is it really harmless? – Himanshi Ahir, Clark Magnet High School
“According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), injuries occurring to pedestrians using their phones have more than doubled since 2004.”

Students explore athletic opportunities beyond the Shalhevet gym – David Edwards, Shalhevet High School
“I’m constantly checking my emails, checking the recruitment websites to see if anyone has committed to any schools that I possibly want to go to, because a certain amount of schools only have a certain amount of spots per year.”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Issues, Indie Films, and Independent Study: this week on Best of SNO

It’s getting cold in Minnesota, land of SNO, but we’re cozying in with some fantastic student journalism. This week, Sally Calengor discusses new affinity groups at Benilde-St. Margaret’s, a Lambert High student profiles three independent films that examine violence against women, and the kids at St. Paul Academy and Summit School are doing some super cool stuff with science. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

Students meet in affinity groups to tackle issues at school – Sally Calengor, Benilde-St. Margaret’s High School
“I believe that the most important part is for kids to have their voice, get results from their voice and then grow from that.”

Films: a platform for gender empowerment – Mahima Siripurapu, Lambert High School
“In a movement to shed light against the atrocities committed against women, budding filmmakers across the globe have created emotionally provocative films that create a push for change within the masses.”

Advanced Science Research grants scientific freedom and flexibility – Javier Whitaker-Castaneda, St. Paul Academy and Summit School
“While the results of the lab may be useful, students definitely gain valuable skills for possible future scientific endeavors.”

The bees’ last buzz – Lauren Becker, The John Carroll School
“They serve a major purpose in terms of maintaining the way that we, not just we as humans, but the way that nature works. They’re a pretty massive keystone species.”

Over 100 Students Potentially Save More than 300 Lives in Central Fall Blood Drive – Hannah Walker and Kimberly Merfert, Chattanooga Central High School
“Most first timers were pretty nervous before, but realized soon after what they were doing was for a good cause.”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!

Protest, Pilot, Protest: this week on Best of SNO

Ah, the glorious sandwich weeks between Thanksgiving and Winter Break. Your mission is to eat as much as you can between now and the end of the year, and we’ve got some great reading to go along with all that food. This week, protests are the thing for the kids at City High and Glen Rock High, and Sarah Castillo profiles a young woman with her head in the clouds and her hands on the yoke. Read on for our weekly picks, written and submitted by students just like yours.

As Hate Crimes Spike Nationwide, Students Lead Silent Protest – Sofie Lie, City High School
“In both protests in the past two weeks, administration has not intervened: such expressions of free speech are fundamental to school-wide unity, asserts Principal John Bacon.”

Head in the Clouds: Zoë Lief – Sarah Castillo, West Ranch High School
“Although the school’s students are typically older men in their 40s and 50s, Zoë is intent on receiving her pilot’s license at the youngest age possible, 17.”

Students protest outside Trump Tower; “Let the New Generation SpeakMichelle DeMaria, Glen Rock High School
“Being surrounded by such a vast group of people and knowing that they shared similar ideas with many of the other protesters eased both the students and prompted them to get in the mix.”

Southern Lehigh High School Addresses Issues of Acceptance and Diversity – Talia Trackim, Nicole Schroy, Allison Borelli, Townsend Colley, Quinn Schmitt, Bridgette Lang, Sarah Jacobson, Southern Lehigh High School
“It’s not everybody, but it is there and it should be addressed,” sophomore Mariama Sohna said. “It doesn’t matter how small the intolerance is.”

Sophomore art student displays her artwork in New York City – America Moreno, Vidal M. Trevino School of Communication and Fine Arts
“It was the poster for the Wonder Woman movie, but I kind of made it look like more of a silhouette like. Just so when you see it you don’t only see Wonder Woman, but maybe any woman that empowers you.”

We love featuring student journalism that’s interesting, well-written, and takes a unique angle on the stories we see every day. Encourage your students to polish up that story (or video or multimedia piece) and submit it right here!