Visions of dazzling rooms I’ll never get let into: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“During the Trump era, Max said, Enquirer reporters kept their heads down. ‘If you were handed an assignment to write a critical piece about one of the president’s foes, you did it,’ he told me. When I asked why he thought the assignments suddenly began materializing, he replied, ‘I didn’t think that deeply. I just wanted to get in and out.’ … The real mystery about the Enquirer, I came to find, is who actually works there. Virtually none of the articles are bylined, and it appears that Howard stopped publishing mastheads sometime in 2017. (Why? I asked Max. ‘Because it’s junk,’ he replied. ‘Why would you want to be associated with that?’) Technically, as Robertson supervises most of the newsroom, the Enquirer’s editor in chief is a veteran AMI employee named Dan Dolan. He is also editor of the Examiner and the Globe. I didn’t learn much about Dolan, except that he assumed control after Howard moved into podcast-land and, according to a non-Max ex-staffer, that he is known to carry a massive knife around the office, apparently for protection.”  Columbia Journalism Review: What happened to the National Enquirer after it went all in for Trump?

Seconded

“We can really make a difference and not only grow ourselves but help our community grow closer together. I know that after I’m gone and graduated, I want to be able to pick up a copy of The Cougar Claw somewhere that’s not a high school.” The Cougar Claw, Kearns High School’s student-run newspaper, is filling a void in its community. (The Salt Lake Tribune)

TGIF

December is the month of lists: Christmas lists, resolution lists, naughty and nice lists, mailing lists… I rest my case. But one genre of lists has a very special December in store. Year-end lists have turned to steroids, morphing into Decade-enders as we approach the Year of Vision Care, 2020. To get you started, The Hollywood Reporter’s “10 Best TV Shows of the Decade”: “Leslie Knope’s Pawnee was a town awash in impediments and complications and even her co-workers presented speed bumps aplenty. Yet the series carried along with the profound belief that people, working together, can make things better for each other and for the world. The decade surely didn’t lack for dark and tormented shows, so let’s top this list with one that’s full of hope and heart and humor.” (A list after my own heart.)

. . . “A Visit From the Goon Squad” (Yes…) is Entertainment Weekly’s book of the decade (YES!)

. . . Taylor Swift is music’s Artist and Woman of the Decade — or for Gen Z Swifties, that of their lifetime (and of their “Finstagrams”)

. . . Speaking of lists: Does the character get their story? Are they competent? Are they ethical? How believable is the journalist? The Ringer’s “Exhaustive Ranking of Movie Journalists” (24. Jim Carrey as Bruce Nolan in Bruce Almighty)

#MillennialProblems

This 30-second Peloton commercial is driving people crazy. Why? “It’s probably some combination of overacting, cheesy background music and a plot about a husband gifting his gorgeous, in-shape wife a $2,000+ exercise bike to help her get even more in-shape.” (Ad Age)

. . . “Ma’am, are you okay? ARE YOU OKAY, MA’AM?” and 48 other questions about the “disturbing Peloton Christmas commercial” (Uproxx)

Sports!

“There is not much more any of them can do. The phone and the internet were cut off months ago. There is still power, although they try not to use it because they know the bill is overdue. The only heat comes from a portable gas canister a fan brought down a few weeks ago. It has been placed next to Joan. ‘He said to tell him when the gas runs out, and he’ll replace it,’ she said.” Why do five employees keep showing up to work every day without pay for a soccer club that’s dead? The New York Times soccer writer Rory Smith asked.

Thinking ahead

After two years away, Jay-Z has released his entire discography back to Spotify. (As my brother’s Twitter bio says, “Life is for living, not living without your entire music library on Spotify.”) Happy listening…

This also happened last week: Katy Perry and Santa got couples massages from reindeer in a video for her new song, “Cozy Little Christmas,” which will not make the cut for my Christmas party playlist.

I’m the one that found all those birds’ nests: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

Fresh Powder is taking the next two weeks off. We’ll be fully decked out in a Santa costume when we return. Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

The lede

“It’s not fake news but it’s not exactly what we want people to be consuming either.” A growing network of close to 40 websites posing as local news outlets have popped up all over Michigan to push politically-slanted information, the Lansing State Journal originally reported.

. . . These websites have also shown up in, at least, Iowa, Montana, Maryland and Florida. The Michigan Daily traced the history of the operation, setup by one guy for the same politically-motivated purpose whose been rebranding his corporation over again every time it’s found out. “It’s one thing to have a blog that explicitly states a person’s opinions and viewpoints, it’s another thing to make a politically targeted message under the guise of journalism.”

. . . Other recently-discovered fake local news sites aren’t motivated by political beliefs; rather, they’re driven by potential advertising revenue and ad networks like Google’s aren’t doing a good enough job policing them. “It’s a license to pretend, and to print money”: BuzzFeed News

Seconded

“Unlike the self-consciously transgressive byproducts of Gen-X ‘serial killer culture,’ this murder was okay to post about on Facebook, or to discuss openly with coworkers. This murder came with a pledge-drive tote bag.” AV Club: “Serial didn’t invent true crime, but it did legitimize it”

TGIF

Last week, I delivered a couple links on the early feedback for two of the marquee Apple TV Plus shows, “The Morning Show” and “Dickinson.” One of those — at least, on my social feeds — has sustained an overwhelmingly positive narrative. Whether or not that has absolutely everything to do with my personal Hailee Steinfeld fandom … yes. Even so, “Dickinson” has garnered such praise for being unapologetically unique-slash-insane. “Dickinson is both stranger and more charming than any historically-revisionist show about a badass, twenty-something incarnation of Emily Dickinson has any right to be.” (The New Republic)

. . . Did you already forget about Apple TV Plus?

#MillennialProblems

“We can feel its gnostic effects on our everyday reality, but we rarely see it, and it’s quite inscrutable to non-initiates.” Slate lists “The Lines of Code That Changed Everything.” (Sorry, amateurs: There’s no Da Vinci, Pass or even Red on this list.)

Sports!

Mary Cain was the fastest girl in America, at 17, and then she joined Nike — and they destroyed her. Listen to her story, in her own words, in The New York Times’ “Equal Pay” video series, which continues to be excellent.

Thinking ahead

The entire scholastic journalism world is descending on Washington D.C. next week… in the middle of impeachment hearings. (Exactly as NSPA/JEA planned it.)

This also happened last week: The Freedom of the Press Foundation is partnering with the Internet Archive to preserve the archives of journalists at Splinter and Deadspin that might otherwise be at risk of being deleted. Pretty cool.

What is black and white and red all over: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

Sorry we ditched you last week. (Needed to freshen up.) Here’s what we missed:

The lede

“Boom. I press it,” or President Trump’s in-depth analysis of his tweeting process, reminds me of the phrase “Eat it,” which a friend and I used to yell at classmates in elementary school P.E. after we chucked a dodgeball or spiked a volleyball at someone’s head. I was 11, the dodgeballs were foam and we only played maybe once a month. Trump is the president of the United States and he tweeted 271 times during the second week of October. In an incredible three-part collaboration of journalism, The New York Times explains, with visual aids, “How Trump Reshaped the Presidency in Over 11,000 Tweets”

. . . I love a good journalism how-it’s-made. Times Insider went there on its Trump Tweets story: “Doing a data analysis without actually reading the content of the tweets wasn’t going to give us the kind of detail that we needed.” (Also: This is literally the dark web.)

Seconded

“Unfortunately, the effort to destroy (Katie) Hill was just beginning. On October 24th, the Daily Mail published more intimate photos … At that point, the damage against Hill’s reputation had been done,” and she resigned three days later. Rolling Stone: Gawker Got Shut Down for Posting a Sex Tape. Why Can the ‘Daily Mail’ Publish Nudes of Katie Hill?

TGIF

Facebook rolled out Facebook News last week, which I wouldn’t have known without Twitter. The basics, from The New York Times: “The product is a new section of the social network’s mobile app that is dedicated entirely to news content, which the company is betting will bring users back to the site regularly to consume news on sports, entertainment, politics and tech.” (Zuck’s maybe not a betting man…)

. . . What about my News Feed? “Facebook News is something else. It will rely on a team of journalists, employed by Facebook, who will highlight stories from other, human-run news organizations that Facebook is vouching for. You know, like a newspaper,” writes Peter Kafka, for Recode. (In other words, your two crazy aunts will continue bombarding your News Feed with fake news.)

. . . IMAGINE HITTING “CAPS LOCK” THE NEXT TIME YOU WRITE YOUR NAME AND CALLING IT A REBRAND: From the geniuses at FACEBOOK

#MillennialProblems

Vox: A new study reveals why female journalists are so much less influential on Twitter than men. On the ramifications: “It’s hard to argue that deciding not to tweet at someone is as bad as male members of Congress opting never to take private meetings with female staff, but it sets women up the same way. When women are excluded from the informal customs that advance careers, they’re left behind.”

Deadspin!

“For a lot of people, blogging seems simple, basically unskilled, something any borderline-literate schmuck could achieve, and separated from “real” journalism, even when the membrane is vanishingly thin.” It’s not true, of course; at least, not at the good ones — like Deadspin, until its executives decided their bloggers were all, as the nasty old stigma goes, replaceable. “When media executives are forced to take on that job themselves, following a series of extraordinary self-created crises, they don’t seem to last very long.” (VICE)

. . . Refusing new ownership’s directive to “stick to sports,” several Deadspin writers published blogs like this, and then promptly quit en masse. The New York Times, on how it all unfolded. (And how’s the site been running since then? The only “person” publishing stories to it is an author named “Deadspin.”)

. . . Here’s the leaked company memo that started everything, from The Daily Beast

. . . Your friendly neighborhood reminder of the other great websites at risk of having the same thing happen, simply because G/O Media owns them, too.

. . . “It has come to my attention that everyone is quitting,” host Molly Fischer starts out. Though it doesn’t make any direct links to Deadspin, the weekly podcast “The Cut on Tuesdays” was very much on time in asking, “How do you know when it’s time to quit?”

Thinking ahead

Apple TV+ released its first set of shows, each carrying more weight than usual: To subscribe to another streaming service, or not to subscribe? That is the question. Here’s what Rolling Stone’s Alan Sepinwall said about the “The Morning Show” and Vulture on “Dickinson,” the latest Hailee Steinfeld vehicle.

This also happened last week: Halloween.

It’s a bear dance: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

In Ann Arbor, Mich., it’s been a decade since the local daily newspaper shut down and The Michigan Daily, the university’s daily student newspaper, assumed the role. “We’ve been given this mantle of holding the powerful accountable, five nights a week, with no department backing us up. It’s a huge responsibility.” The New York Times followed those student journalists, biking through literal rainstorms and figurative hurricane-force course loads to keep their city’s residents informed, challenged, too, by, “the temporary nature of their positions. Unlike their professional counterparts, student reporters and editors learn on the job, and they invariably move on after a few semesters, well before developing sources or truly understanding the complexities of their beat, whether City Hall or the financial markets.” (College journalists are rock stars.)

Seconded

“The chances seemed high that Romney, a known family man, would want to keep close tabs on his offspring. And as luck would have it, Romney has plenty of offspring. Not all of his five sons have public Twitter accounts, and some of them, like the dreaded Tagg, have too many followers to possibly dig through. Romney’s oldest grandchild, Allie Romney Critchlow, however, has just 481 followers, making digging through them an annoying-but-not-impossible feat.” And so, the search for Mitt Romney’s secret Twitter account was born. Slate found it.

TGIF

“In a perfect world, creating the podcast would be their full-time jobs, and it’d pay like it, too. ‘But if we were unable to do that without tipping into a balance of enough listeners that it stops feeling like the community that it is,’ Marshall says, ‘Then I wouldn’t be so crazy about that.’” In the Columbia Journalism Review: “Can a ‘nobody’ make a popular, financially stable podcast?” (Or: The existential question that keeps me up at night.)

#MillennialProblems

What are they teaching kids in schools these days? High schools across the country are endorsing TikTok by sponsoring student-led clubs for it. “We’re thinking this is possibly the new Schoolhouse Rock.” (The New York Times)

. . . “TikTok Girls Dance to Audio of Toxic Exes’ Rants in Latest Darkly Funny (and Empowering) Trend” (Rolling Stone)

Sports!

Maven, the company that bought and gutted Sports Illustrated, “does not have sufficient resources to fully fund its business operations through June 30, 2020,” a report in Fortune detailed this week. “Moving forward, the company will need a ‘significant’ amount of additional capital and even that would produce no guarantee the business is self-sustainable.”

Thinking ahead

Mal and Jason are back in our lives this week with the first of their “Binge Mode: Star Wars” podcast series. May the Force be with them.

This also happened last week: Speaking of “Star Wars,” “The Rise of Skywalker” movie trailer was released Monday, coinciding with the Fall of Darnold.

It’s all still unfolding: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

For the second time in as many weeks, a changeover in ownership is preceding the shakedown of a significant journalistic institution — only, unlike at Sports Illustrated, this one is going to take several years to finish. Poynter: “Is USA Today’s print edition headed for the sunset as GateHouse and Gannett merge? Signs point to yes.”

Seconded

“I just decided to take this as an opportunity to show you guys how the songs sounded when I first wrote them.” Taylor Swift’s Tiny Desk Concert has arrived.

TGIF

“She recently posted an image of herself eating a grilled cheese alone in her room, with a screengrab from a YouTuber she didn’t know, who was eating a whole plate of grilled cheeses. ‘I’ll eat my meal with someone else eating, but we don’t know each other,’ she says. ‘That was sort of my idea, two people who aren’t aware of each other, sharing this meal together, from their rooms, alone.’” The AtlanticWhy the New Instagram It Girl Spends All Her Time Alone

#MillennialProblems

Where to go for breaking fashion news: Instagram. “There are thousands of accounts on Instagram devoted to the branding and pricing of celebrity wares. Many of them are run by teenagers. Now a cottage industry has emerged, spurring fierce competition between friends and fellow admirers who want to get the word out first.” Are ‘Closet Accounts’ the Future of Fashion Journalism? (The New York Times)

Sports!

From The New York Times, I’m Michael Ba—(record scratch sound). Mina Kimes will host ESPN’s new morning podcast. (The Washington Post) “We’re going to do investigative stories — but there should be room for joy and passion, and I think that’s what makes sports different generally and also the podcast.”

. . . Oh, you don’t know Mina Kimes? Now you do.

Thinking ahead

Tiger Woods is writing a memoir. (But to what length is he really willing to memoir it?)

What a great website: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

I bought Sports Illustrated to read it, because, as a student of sportswriting, it was the bible. TheMaven Inc., or the newest enemy of the people, bought SI to destroy it. On Thursday, The Enemy laid off 40 people, of the 160 employed at the “sports media bible,” as it plans to infuse the print and digital publication with 200 contractors (a.k.a. blog boys at cheap prices) to cover sports instead: The Wall Street Journal 

. . . “Subscribe to SI! Too late. The bad guys are in charge.” The Ringer’s Bryan Curtis on a grossly mismanaged 24 hours of lies and layoffs and why you and me and even The Athletic can do very little to stop the bleeding.

. . . This is not about journalism dying. (It isn’t). This isn’t even about the enemy big business is to journalism. (OK, maybe it is a little.) “It is about the way people think writing is dying because reading is dying, even though neither actually are … Once you could get a quick fix immediately, the value of the extra stuff that took a couple of more days diminished and eventually expired. The gift of waiting for the definitive explanation had been lost, an unintended corpse in the slaughterhouse of the new technological order.” Deadspin: “See you in hell!”

. . . “Yesterday, Sports Illustrated terminated dozens of incredible journalists who take with them a level of passion and talent for storytelling I was constantly in awe of. Some of their best work:” Robert Klemko, a football writer for SI, assembled a must-read Twitter thread.

Seconded

From Baltimore to Kenya, Turkey to China, Vietnam to South Africa and everywhere in between, BuzzFeed News shows us who our teachers are — all over the world.

TGIF

What to do when your television network bids farewell to two critically-acclaimed titles: Lock arms with Archie, Jughead, Betty and Veronica and march onward. The Ringer: “The CW is already working to expand Riverdale’s footprint beyond its narrative universe. Between ‘Batwoman’ and ‘Nancy Drew,’ the network is committed to making nostalgia staples a little bit grimmer and a whole lot sexier—a younger network’s version of CBS continuing to crank out new multicam sitcoms. Because in the face of growing uncertainty, why not stick with what works?”

. . . Betty’s ponytail returns this week. Gizmodo: “Riverdale’s Gonna Riverdale”

#MillennialProblems

“Perhaps it’s a good thing if, as Tolentino put it, young writers have since been disabused of the notion that ‘the best thing they have to offer is the worst thing that ever happened to them.’” In a culture bubbling over with bloggers, the Lena Dunhams are not the only ones who make it. (That’s a good thing.) But to what personal cost does “making it” come? For BuzzFeed News, a personal essayist looks introspectively: “Am I Writing About My Life, or Selling Myself Out?”

Sports!

The people who don’t think college athletes should be paid — or, at least, be able to profit from their name and likeness — are only thinking about how that relates to major college football and basketball. That’s a nearsighted opinion. Remember Katelyn Ohashi, the viral UCLA gymnast? She argues, for The New York Times, that California’s Fair Pay to Play Act is “about recognizing that women only receive 4 percent of coverage in all sports media and giving us the freedom to leverage sponsored deals to break through.”

. . . “A business school student at the University of Utah, junior Britain Covey recently pursued and was offered an internship in sales. Then the NCAA told the Utes wide receiver he couldn’t accept it. A compliance committee for the organization that oversees collegiate athletics nationwide told Covey the position would violate its policy on athletes prospering from the commercial use of their name, image or likeness.” (Salt Lake Tribune)

. . . Video: You have to watch this Tampa Bay Rays relay to home plate, even if you already have. (Sends a shiver down your spine, don’t it?)

Thinking ahead

Set your podcast app to Subscribe: The world’s favorite receptionist and its coldest cat parent are sitting down to rewatch “The Office,” to discuss one episode per week until the end. (Please party plan accordingly.) “Office Ladies” premieres Oct. 16.

This also happened last week: Repeat after me, “I am smart. I am blessed. I can do anything.

Swaying room as the music starts: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

We are living in a world where everyone gets their own podcast (even us), which is to say: “What started as a quiet digital backwater is now increasingly growing in prominence, drawing the attention of audiences and moneyed interests alike. In all probability, the medium is heading into a future where it firmly becomes part of the broader entertainment industrial complex. And the story of how we got here can be told via two major turning points: The first was everything that happened before and after 2014. The second turning point is happening right now.” We’re entering the era of Big Podcasting, reports Vulture.

Seconded

“They were building conversations in communities and those were the people who are breaking out. So why not apply that to our brand?” Recode: How Complex Networks CEO Rich Antoniello learned to stop worrying and love YouTube. (Or: The common answer to all SNO video support questions, “Just use YouTube.”)

TGIF

Deploying music of the time to establish setting — or what’s so beloved about shows like “Stranger Things” and “GLOW” — is the exact idea used in “Hustlers,” a movie set in a more recent time. Writes Jia Tolentino in the New Yorker, “The music, like the costuming, immerses you in the temporal setting: if you’re above a certain age, 2007 is recent enough to feel like yesterday, until you see Destiny in a bedazzled top from Bebe and hear the sound of Sean Kingston’s ‘Beautiful Girls.’” (Ahh, high school…)

. . . Sara Moonves is “The Most Watched Editor at Fashion Week” (NYT)

#MillennialProblems

“When my car turned the last switchback into the valley toward Area 51, the car radio, theretofore static, suddenly started blasting Smetana’s Má Vlast in eerie, crystal-perfect sound. The aliens, it seemed, were classical music buffs.” For The Guardian, a reporter “stormed” Area 51.

Sports!

When you need something for everyone: The Ringer is breaking down reasons to watch every single NBA team this season, one team at a time.

Thinking ahead

That collab was too good to be true. “Tedder said he was “utilizing ‘sarcasm’, ‘kidding’ and a ‘joke’ simultaneously” when he told a journalist there would be “one song featuring Beyoncé and Adele with a Chris Martin piano solo on the bridge” on OneRepublic’s forthcoming album Human.” (EW)

This also happened last week: In SNL’s season premiere, musical guest Billie Eilish danced on the ceiling, a trick made famous by Fred Astaire.

Evaporate, tall person: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“Fake News” may just be words to some, but to journalists it signals an endangering stance to protecting the free press and, specifically, the people who practice it. “The current administration has retreated from our country’s historical role as a defender of the free press,” writes the publisher of The New York Times. “Seeing that, other countries are targeting journalists with a growing sense of impunity,” putting reporters’ lives at risk. In one case, a NYT reporter in Egypt was being detained and deported in “apparent retaliation for exposing information that was embarrassing to the Egyptian government.” When the NYT protested the move and sought government help, “a senior official at the United States Embassy in Cairo openly voiced the cynical worldview behind the Trump administration’s tolerance for such crackdowns. ‘What did you expect would happen to him?’ he said. ‘His reporting made the government look bad.’” (Sheesh…) A.G. Sulzberger, in NYTThe Growing Threat to Journalism Around the World.

Seconded

“This may seem pretty self-explanatory, but people still get confused about what else can or should get published in newspapers.” The Daily Eastern News: “What is journalism?” (It’s what I studied and practiced when I was at Eastern Illinois University, home of the Eastern News.)

TGIF

In what can only be assumed was a premeditated effort to scare viewers away, Fox picked Jenny McCarthy as its host for the Emmys red carpet show on Sunday. (E! must have someone on the inside. There cannot possibly be another explanation for this.) It went as badly as you’d expect, “much to the distress of her celebrity victims.” (The Cut)

. . . The New England Patriots might have preferred McCarthy to what they faced this weekend after releasing Antonio Brown. So far, their coach walked out of his press conference Friday and stared down a sideline reporter in silence Sunday. (Bold strategy, Cotton.)

#MillennialProblems

Two #MeToo books are released around the same time. One is a clinical, excellent representation of how reporting on a complex issue happens. The other? BuzzFeed News: “Where Kantor and Twohey present the key cultural context for their reporting … that is completely devoid in the book by Pogrebin and Kelly.”

. . . “Like being hit by lightning.” BuzzFeed News on what happens to a book when it’s marked with a celebrity’s book club approval. (The ole Joan Calamezzo bump.)

Sports!

Will she or won’t she make it happen? ESPN and Katie Nolan’s little-watched, late-night variety sports talk show, Always Late with Katie Nolan, is entering its second season. “I watch John Oliver’s show and I’m like, ‘We can do that,’” Nolan told SI.

. . . While Nolan was doing that interview, Oliver’s show was sweeping the Emmys’ two Variety Talk Series categories for the fourth consecutive year.

Thinking ahead

We’ll be keeping an eye on Vox Media’s acquisition of New York Media, the company behind New York magazine, The CutVulture and more culture news sites frequently linked to in this very newsletter.

This also happened last week: “She’s here, and she’s beautiful,” says Pizza Hut of their new juiced-up Cheez-It, the glorious calzone of Cheez-Its if you will. (Coincidentally, I too am made up of 70 percent cheese, 29 percent Cheez-It and 1 percent water. Huh.)

If it’s out of a can, then nothing: this week on Fresh Powder

The lede

Since its release last week, praise poured in for the Netflix limited series Unbelievable, in which Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting is adapted for the small screen. Kaitlyn Dever portrays Marie, a real-life rape victim accused of lying. “Marie said in a recent interview that she is grateful for the Netflix series, hopeful its lessons will resonate,” updates ProPublica, which originally reported Marie’s story and others in exploring the cost of not believing victims and the failures of law enforcement.

. . . From 2016: Read the original piece by ProPublica and The Marshall Project: “An Unbelievable Story of Rape” (It would win the Pulitzer for Explanatory Reporting.)

. . . Rolling Stone: “Dramatizations that are lazy or rote can undermine the gravity of the topic and do a genuine disservice to the people who’ve suffered that real-life trauma. With Unbelievable, the creative team and superb cast treat the subject with the seriousness and grace it deserves, while also telling one hell of a story along the way.” (I highly recommend it.)

Seconded

Cokie Roberts is considered “one of a handful of pioneering female journalists … who helped shape the public broadcaster’s sound and culture at a time when few women held prominent roles in journalism.” NPR: Cokie Roberts Dies At 75.

TGIF

Netflix’s purchase of Seinfeld’s streaming rights for an incendiary sum says more about its current state of mind after losing bids to retain The Office and Friends than it does about what it thinks of Seinfeld independently. The Ringer, on these latest developments from the front lines of the escalating Streaming Wars: “Neither The Office nor Friends were Netflix originals, but they might as well have been to the binge viewers who watched them more than any in-house productions. So when those two series were set to leave Netflix, (they) were left staring down their own version of a chicken-and-egg problem: Had Netflix become a generation’s go-to because it had nostalgic touchstones from their youth, or had Friends and The Officebecome nostalgic touchstones because the service was already where millennials went for background viewing? Netflix has opted not to find out.”

. . . Alas we address the monkey in the living room: “Friends Is Older Than Some of Its Biggest Fans,” writes The New York Times. (Find someone your own age!)

#MillennialProblems

Newsrooms in MinneapolisSt. Louis and Boston handed over control of their Instagram accounts for the summer to a few college interns, resulting in huge growth, expanded reach and plentiful usage. From Poynter: “Traditionally, newsrooms have used Instagram to showcase their photographers’ work. There’s still room for that … but it’s also a way to help raise awareness of traditional journalism’s other work.”

. . . How to share traditional stories on non-traditional social media platforms to capture the attention of younger audiences is precisely what Poynter’s MediaWise is trying to figure out. “We want to presume TikTok won’t be a vehicle for publishing investigative journalism. However, given the way technology has evolved, there’s no way to tell for sure.”

Sports!

“SI conducted interviews with more than two dozen people who have employed, worked for, coached, or played alongside Brown.” In an exclusive storySports Illustrated found that there’s a lot more to the Antonio Brown story.

Thinking ahead

Where to turn to when you’re single and have exhausted all other resources: a dating doctor for your phone? Wired: “The folly of love is not so much about what we do when we are flooded with feelings, but what can happen when we have incomplete data. This is perhaps why a crop of new apps have arrived, harnessing the powers of artificial intelligence, to offer relationship advice.” (I’d have sunk $9 into it 15 years ago. Sure.)

This also happened last week: A college student’s case for Sharpay Evans, hero of the High School Musical trilogy, went viral, but for the greatest movie counter argument of all time, we give you this: Violet Beauregarde should‘ve won Wonka’s chocolate factory (Don’t @ us.)

Can you spell Gabbana: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“The FDA is “troubled” about Juul’s marketing and outreach efforts, particularly in high schools, Sharpless said. He pointed to a testimony from a student who said that a Juul representative came into his school touting it as “much safer than cigarettes” and that the “FDA was about to come out and say it was 99% safer than cigarettes.” CNBC: Those statements, the FDA says now, are either false or unverified, and making them could be breaking the law.

. . . CNN: A sixth person died from vaping-related lung disease. Here’s what you need to know.

. . . In 1998, the reckoning came for the tobacco industry. CNN: “Joe Camel and his ilk are now in intensive care … Billboards will be coming down, and the real truth about tobacco will be available to every American.”

Seconded

Where to look when you need new bulletin board material? New York Magazine‘s Q&A with Kara Swisher. “I think most people do know when they’re good at things, and they do know their value, but then other people chip away at it,” but not Swisher, the best tech reporter on the planet and the namesake for SNO’s seventh web server.

TGIF

Thank Goodness it’s … Fashion? The Cut is writing all about the year in fashion 2009. (Still waiting for my interview request.)

#MillennialProblems

Inching us ever closer to a future sans-cable bills with 15 different streaming bills instead, Recode summarizes everything we know about the next service you’ll feel like you have to add with one important caveat: ”None of this matters at all if Apple can’t create stuff people want to watch.” (I don’t know, Dickinson feels exactly ludicrous enough to work.)

Sports!

HBO’s Hard Knocks is frequently entertaining, sometimes extraordinarily air-headed — like when it completely whiffs on the Oakland Raiders’ Antonio Brown drama. The Ringer’s Claire McNear: “These weren’t minor questions—these were the questions, for the Raiders and, to some degree, for the NFL as a whole. One of the best players in football, who has just made one of the most potentially meaningful changes of teams in the sport, might not play this season, and perhaps not ever for his new squad. And despite an NFL documentary that promised us a month and a half of unlimited access, we’re none the wiser for it.”

Thinking ahead

No dancing with aliens under the stars after all. The “Storm Area 51” music festival was canceled as organizers feared it’d be “FYREFEST 2.0.” (NBC News)

This also happened last week: The Atlantic, a Fresh Powder mainstay, announced its decision to shift to a paid online subscription modelLe sigh.