You got your shot, now give me mine: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“It was like Armageddon, basically.” Australians exited the weekend further reeling from their summer of disastrous weather after a dust storm preceded a massive hail storm, with hurricane-force winds, in the southeastern part of the country. “The storm was intense and fast-moving. The territory’s Emergency Services Agency reported receiving a record 1,900 calls for help — more than three times the average for a storm.” (NPR)

. . . “Dozens of communities across Australia’s southeast are still reeling from fires which have been described as the most destructive on record. Since September, blazes have killed at least 30 people, destroyed over 2,000 homes and burnt through 10 million hectares of land – an area almost the size of England.” The latest from BBC: Australia’s brushfires are far from over.

. . . Despite the brushfires, the Australian Open tennis tournament got started without delay Sunday, though not without disputes over the safety of the air quality ahead of time. AP: One player complained, “people in Melbourne were advised to keep their pets indoors on the day he played, ‘and yet we were expected to go outside for high intensity physical competition?’”

Seconded

“The editorial board is an institutional voice, but it is not the voice of the institution as a whole. That’s a crucial distinction that often gets lost. The board doesn’t speak for the newsroom. How could it?” The New York TimesWhat is an Editorial Board?

. . . Now that that’s out of the way: The NYT editorial board likes Amy… and Elizabeth. (Top that, Des Moines Register.)

TGIThursday

Where are you shopping this weekend? “In my early 20s, I bought a 300-count box of dryer sheets at Costco. The first problem with the box was that it caused me to contemplate my mortality: The box was going to last me six years, which meant I’d probably only ever need to buy nine more such boxes, and then I would be dead. The box was far from used up when I moved from Washington to New York, and I paid movers to move it along with my other possessions. Shortly thereafter, I threw away the box, which still must have contained more than 150 sheets, because, like a typical millennial, I gave up using fabric softener. (It’s bad for your workout clothes!)” Josh Barro: When Buying in Bulk Is a Mistake

#MillennialProblems

“While she is proud of being ‘born and raised a Jersey girl,’ it was only in Jordan that she began to take pride in her roots. She learned Arabic and appreciated Middle Eastern food and hospitality. When she returned to the U.S., she began to wear a headscarf as an act of defiance against a rising anti-Muslim tide. ‘I lost a lot of friends, people started treating me differently,’ she said. But she also became an ambassador for her faith. Students, even teachers, stopped her in school and asked about the Quran and Islam. ‘I had to learn as much as I possibly could about my own religion, the ins and outs of it, what Islamophobes were saying about it, so that I could understand how to respond.’” Mistreatment in the years after 9/11 forced Amani Al-Khatahtbeh’s family to flee the US, and later inspired her to build MuslimGirl.com, where she’s dispelling stereotypes for two million readers. (AP)

Sports!

The Los Angeles City Council approved a resolution to urge Major League Baseball to strip away the 2017 and 2018 World Series titles from the Houston Astros and Boston Red Sox and reward them to the Los Angeles Dodgers. (A hilariously bad waste of time.)

Thinking ahead

No kidding: The Onion is entering the daily news podcast business. It premieres Jan. 29. (Is this bad? This is bad, isn’t it?)

This also happened last week: While Las Vegas has been locked in as host of the 2020 NFL Draft, it was announced that the stage will be on the water at the Fountains of Bellagio. “The players will be transported to the stage by boat.”

Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

Apparently, you can quit your family. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are showing us the way. “After many months of reflection and internal discussions, we have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution. We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen. It is with your encouragement, particularly over the last few years, that we feel prepared to make this adjustment.” (People)

. . . “The Queen is not thrilled. Buckingham Palace aides are ‘shocked,’ ‘devastated’ and ‘downright furious.’ And, according to the Daily Mail’s sources, Harry and I ‘spent weeks secretly plotting’ [our] decision … in what one insider branded a ‘staggering level of deceit.’ They were wrong. It has not been weeks. It has been decades.” Washington PostHonestly, I, Meghan Markle, have been plotting this my entire life

. . . BuzzFeed NewsHere Are 20 Headlines Comparing Meghan Markle To Kate Middleton That Might Show Why She And Prince Harry Are Cutting Off Royal Reporters

Seconded

“In less than a month, after Iowans gather to hash it out, the race will move on to New Hampshire and beyond, and Ms. Pfannenstiel, like her predecessors, will have to accustom herself to a sudden quiet.” For now, Brianne Pfannenstiel and The Des Moines Register are the reporter and paper of record in the middle of the Democratic primary. (The New York Times)

TGIThursday

Chain restaurants get a bad rap, man. But they give people jobs, better pay on average than places with fancier plates, health insurance, and foundational on-site training for those who want to pay attention. (Hey, one person’s lizard in a salad is another’s School of Hard Knocks.) NYTCurrent Job: Award-Winning Chef. Education: University of IHOP.

#MillennialProblems

Why does New Jersey’s state government have a Twitter account and how is it so good? Meet Megan Coyne and Pearl Gabel. The New Yorker: “Coyne scrolled through Twitter, looking for material. ‘Someone’s tweeting about how Trenton doesn’t deserve to be the capital of New Jersey,’ she said. ‘We could do a response to that. ‘How rude.’’ They let that idea drop. Gabel surveyed her desk for inspiration: a cucumber water, a half-eaten muffin. ‘Maybe it could just be ‘muffin.’” (Spoiler: The tweet would not end up being, “muffin,” but contemplation is half the fun.)

. . . NYTThe Mystery of Teen Vogue’s Disappearing Facebook Article. “As the debate about the article made Teen Vogue a trending topic on Twitter, another online critic linked to the article and posed the question, “What is this Teen Vogue?” To that, the verified Teen Vogue account replied in a tweet that was later deleted: “literally idk.”

Sports!

From a Major League Baseball investigation into sign-stealing operations, the managers of two of the last three World Series champions have been fired. ESPN’s David Schoenfield: “They knew. They knew what they were doing was wrong. They knew they were cheating. Not much different from the PED users some two decades ago shooting up in secret. They knew.”

. . . Sports journalism news: ESPN is preparing an offer that could make Tony Romo the highest-paid sports broadcaster in history

Thinking ahead

Scarlett Johansson is the first actor in 12 years to be nominated for two Academy Awards in the same year, as she earned nods in the lead and support actress categories for different movies this week. (Weird, because it was supposed to be Margot Robbie’s year.)

This also happened last week: A massive Wizarding World of Harry Potter store, spanning three floors and 20,000 square feet, is coming to New York this summer.

We were on a break: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

We haven’t published a Fresh Powder in 22 days. We’ve eaten many pies in the interim, sure, traveled long distances and watched many football games, but haven’t consumed a whole bunch of news. Luckily, somebody’s been flagging stories along the way to go back to after the Christmas trees came down. (Me. That somebody is me.) The holidays were bananas on the brain, as usual. I can’t wake up on time anymore, I hardly know what day it is, and I completely forgot how to play ping pong (tragic, at our particular place of business). As we all start to remember how to tie our shoes again, there’s a lot of news to catch up on. Some of it’s good and thought-provoking (we’ll get there) and some stuff you just need to know. Let’s start with this: Donald J. Trump is still the president. That’s very clear. Although he was impeached before break, little has moved the needle on it since, as the opposing parties spar with sticks for swords over the rules. Here’s the latest: “Pelosi’s refusal to transmit the articles as she sought information about the scope of the trial, including witnesses, has also spurred a number of Republican senators to craft legislation and strategize about how they could begin the trial without the House’s blessing. But McConnell, speaking privately to his members, made clear that he would not make any moves on a trial until the articles had been formally transmitted.” (Washington Post) This calls for a mom.

. . . What about the Democratic candidates for president? Who’s left? That depends on how long it’s been since you refreshed your feed. Vox: “The field has been expanding up until the last minute. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg filed for the Alabama primary right before the deadline. Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has entered the race. Even Hillary Clinton is taking calls encouraging her to run again, though she says it is exceedingly unlikely she’d seek the White House for a third time.” (I’m with Hillary. Who’s watching this race thinking, “Yeah, I wanna do that!”?) The next debate is Jan. 14.

. . . Even more is going on around the world. Here’s the latest on Australia and Iran.

. . . Politico asked 23 historians, “How Will History Books Remember the 2010s?” How’s this sound? (*clears throat*): “The 2010s, in hindsight, began with the 2007-08 financial crisis. The inability to foresee and prevent that crisis, combined with the subsequent lack of punishment for anyone behind it, served notice to much of the population that the establishment (whatever that was) was no longer doing its job (whatever that meant). As the crisis led to economic collapse in rural and formerly industrial areas, working-class and lower-middle-class citizens responded angrily to what they saw as a broader failure by elites (not just in politics but also in the media, think tanks and academia) to respond to the problems of globalization (including trade, immigration and crumbling communities) that primarily afflicted the left-behind regions. The result was a furious populist backlash—one that played out in country after country across the developed world, with movements that were more or less alike in their grievances and lack of coherent solutions.” (Rolls off the tongue, don’t it?)

Seconded

We have officially made it back to an Olympic year. (Sup, Tokyo?)

TGIF

Game of Thrones came and went in the 2010s, but the deconstructions of its final season — perhaps 2019’s hottest topic in entertainment — seem alive and well. Vox’s Emily Todd VanDerWerff wrapped up the year writing about the falsehoods it tried telling us about those who want power. (It’s a doozy.) “The idea that wanting a thing makes you someone who perhaps shouldn’t have it is too often a pretty fiction designed to prop up an unjust status quo. Those who want to change the status quo, who long for power to make sure that things shift and are altered, well, they’re the ones we can’t trust? … No one less than Donald J. Trump used variations on this idea for much of his public life. (This is a man who, in 1987, famously said that he’d never want to be president.) It was only when he felt as if only he could make America great again that he ran, the gray champion who refuses and refuses and refuses the call until it’s almost too late, and he rides in from the east to save the republic.” (Told ya.)

. . . Speaking of power: “Taylor Swift Bent the Music Industry to Her Will,” in the 2010s (Vulture)

#MillennialProblems

“A deeply felt, mostly unexamined, sense that tech would lead to a freer and more convenient existence was the midwife of our digital present. It allowed the creator of a website to rate the attractiveness of Harvard’s women students to build an advertising platform with $55 billion in annual revenue. It allowed an online shop created to sell books to build a $25.7 billion cloud computing network. It allowed a company that started as a way for rich people to summon private drivers to turn itself into $47 billion, well, whatever the hell Uber is.” Alright, we really let the internet get away from us during the 2010s. BuzzFeed News reporter Joseph Bernstein puts it into perspective really well, I thought, that if, perhaps, our eternal optimism for a future the World Wide Web could create is how we allowed once-niche startups to explode, then, perhaps, we have only ourselves to blame for everything we hate about it today. Bernstein would say it has alienated us more than it ever brought us together: “Even when we get ‘good’ information online, we can’t always be sure where it’s coming from and why we’re seeing it when we’re seeing it. A profit-driven information apparatus uses a huge and growing fake user base to juice the statistics it shows to advertisers. The incentive is not to show you true things, but to be able to claim as many people as possible are seeing something, anything. To be no different to the men with the money than a bot, that’s an alienation. To not know where the things you read and see come from, nor that they’re real, that’s an alienation. To labor to pick out true from false, and know that many Americans don’t bother to do the same, that’s an alienation.”

. . . To the Xanga, AIM and Myspace crowd: Do you know where your content is? “Despite the constant flurries of social startups, when the dust was blown off the chisel, the 2010s revealed that the content you made — your photos, your writing, your texts, emails, and DMs — is almost exclusively in the hands of the biggest tech companies: Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, or Apple. The rest? Who knows? I hate to tell you, but there’s a good chance it’s gone forever.” (Narrator: Fresh Powder is powered by Google, a big tech company.)

Sports!

Video: Butler, Freese, Paterno, Donovan, Rice, and Rousey, the bat toss, the Miracle, the black out, the Masters, and the block. Have you embraced all the feels and re-lived all the memories from ESPN’s Images of the Decade yet?

Thinking ahead

“They’ve grown up with social media, and their fluency with these platforms means they understand how they should and shouldn’t shape discourse. They’ve watched ‘fake news’ become a kitchen-table term. It’s their vantage point, often lower to the ground floor on the issues that impact them, that gives them a unique perspective on where journalism goes from here.” The Future of the News Industry, According to Student Journalists (Teen Vogue)

This also happened during the break: “It’s very Bostonian. The idea of a truck heist involved in Charlestown with lobsters is very, very unique to this great city.” Meanwhile, on New Year’s Eve in Times Square, Dominos was selling pizzas for $30. (It’s OK, they were larges.)

From a pile of stuff: this week on Fresh Powder

The lede

I went to the Newseum for the first time last month. The status update alone prompted many messages of jealousy from my journalism pals, which suggests the mythic aura it holds to those in, or who have studied, media who have never been. I enjoyed it and was very happy to have seen it, but, at the same time, I was chaotically overwhelmed by it. (I was, however, immensely disappointed in the gift shop. I bought the only T-shirt with the name Newseum on it and they had absolutely nothing to buy that had anything to do with the First Amendment.) I commented then that I could’ve spend a full eight hours in the museum. There was so much to see and read, and as a first-time visitor — long-time blind admirer — you don’t think about why you’re overwhelmed or if its a negative that you could spend a full day there. Those with a better perspective, and perhaps a few more visits to their name, now do, as the museum prepares to close its doors Dec. 31. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Hiltzik: “Among the Newseum’s most prominent artifacts are a piece of the Berlin Wall and the antenna mast that stood atop the World Trade Center’s north tower until 9/11. These are items of historical interest, certainly, but what’s the rationale for placing them inside a news museum, other than that they represent events that were, well, covered in the news?” (Come to think of it, spending so much time off the bat in the FBI exhibit definitely affected how much time we had to walk through the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs exhibit at the end.): Los Angeles Times

Seconded

“Many will recall reading To Kill a Mockingbird and Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, both of which have girl narrators, but these books aren’t about girl culture, whereas several books that center on boys and boy culture have been assigned and canonized, from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer to The Catcher in the Rye. The absence of Little Women in classrooms could suggest that a story about female ambition and adventure should be treated as dangerous.” Little Women Is A Big, Important American Masterpiece. Let’s Treat It Like One. (Elle)

. . . NYTMoments in Reading That Salvaged an Often Sour Year

TGIF

Last spring, we checked into the succession plan for Lori Loughlin as the Hallmark channel’s go-to star for Christmas movies. Here’s an update, from the New York Post, as the spotlight shifts to Gretchen Wieners, from “Mean Girls,” and D.J. Tanner from “Full House.” (Not their real names.)

#MillennialProblems

HuffPostA Guide To The Memes That Defined A Decade (And Where They Are Now)

Sports!

The New York Times caught a glimpse into a week in the life of ESPN’s Mina Kimes. “I like taking calls while I’m walking Lenny, but it’s always awkward, trying to juggle a phone while picking up after your dog.”

. . . More than $150,000 in donations have been pledged to a local food pantry in the Ohio hometown of this year’s Heisman Trophy winner since his speech Saturday night. (ESPN)

Thinking ahead

Vox Media is preparing to lay off hundreds of contracted employees in response to California’s Assembly Bill 5, which requires employers to reclassify their contract workers as full-time employees and offer them benefits.

This also happened last week: A new way to try wrapping Christmas presents. (Happy wrapping and happy holidays from us at SNO!)

Knee deep in the hoopla: this week on Fresh Powder

The lede
Well, we had a good run, journalism and the movies. For some time now, Hollywood’s been a hero-making machine for journalists and their likenesses on the big screen (see, most recently, Julia Stiles portraying journalist Jessica Pressler in “Hustlers”: Boring, yes, but a good reporter). But now, a nasty fight is breaking out over the upcoming movie “Richard Jewell” and its depiction of former Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Kathy Scruggs, who, in the movie, enters into a sexual relationship with an FBI agent as a way to get information on the investigation into the 1996 bombing in Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park. “The AJC’s reporter is reduced to a sex-trading object in the film,” reads a letter sent to the filmmakers by the newspaper. The paper is requesting a disclaimer be added to the movie to say that some situations had been dramatized. “The assertion in the film that the AJC relied recklessly on questionable sourcing is itself reckless.” (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

. . . “It is unfortunate and the ultimate irony that the Atlanta Journal Constitution, having been part of the rush to judgement of Richard Jewell, is now trying to malign our filmmakers and cast,” is, presumably, not the response the AJC wanted. (Them are fightin words.)

. . . “I think this letter makes it clear how seriously we take the misrepresentation of our reporters’ actions and of the actions of the newspaper during that time. We have been clear about how disturbed we are in the film’s use of a Hollywood trope about reporters … and how it misrepresents how seriously journalists concern themselves with reporting accurately and ethically.” (Variety)

. . . The film is not based on Scruggs’ reporting, though she is a major player in it — being the first to break the story that the FBI was investigating Jewell. (Vanity Fair is the source material.) The real shame in this he-said, she-said, though, is that she (Scruggs) is not alive to defend herself. Now, her colleagues are left to stand for Scruggs’ reputation: “She was never at peace or at rest with this story. It haunted her until her last breath. It crushed her like a junebug on the sidewalk.” (It’s “The Ballad of Kathy Scruggs” vs. “The Ballad of Richard Jewell”)

. . . This, of course, is not the first time journalism has been misrepresented in film. “A Christmas Prince” is a fictional fairytale, but these, most definitely, are not representative reporters’ notes.

Seconded
“The tasks we’ll need help with will change, as our reporting and our stories evolve. But we’re starting at ground zero: What are your biggest questions about the technologies you use every day?” Recode by Vox is launching the Open Sourced Reporting Network, an email community for everyday people to contribute to its tech reporting.

TGIF
Flashback to the first Golden Globes of this decade: Five of the 10 television shows nominated in the “Best Drama” and “Best Musical or Comedy” categories were on broadcast TV channels — FOX, ABC, NBC, CBS — while AMC and HBO made up the rest. (Par for the course.) Ten years later? “Broadcast TV Shows And Actors Were Completely Shut Out Of The Golden Globes For The First Time Ever” (BuzzFeed News)

#MillennialProblems
“People need to follow official New Jersey state twitter right now before the FBI steps in,” tweeted @Jim_Edwards. He’s right. It’s getting wild and crazy over on the @NJGov account. “Who let New Jersey have a Twitter,” someone asked. “your mom,” @NJGov answered.

. . . Mediaite: “The New Jersey State Twitter Account Is Going Full Jersey” (No, it’s not a hack.)

Sports!
‘Tis the season when dad recommits himself to making his son a prototypical left-handed pitcher because Gerrit Cole is about to get paid $324 million over the next nine years.

Thinking ahead
Before you set your resolute number — books to read in 2020 — for New Year’s, here’s Lit Hub’s list of the best 10 (and then some) literary TV adaptations of the decade (or, “Game of Thrones” and others that aren’t “Game of Thrones”).

This also happened last week: Michael, a kindergartner in Michigan, invited his entire class to the courthouse to witness his adoption.

Visions of dazzling rooms I’ll never get let into: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“During the Trump era, Max said, Enquirer reporters kept their heads down. ‘If you were handed an assignment to write a critical piece about one of the president’s foes, you did it,’ he told me. When I asked why he thought the assignments suddenly began materializing, he replied, ‘I didn’t think that deeply. I just wanted to get in and out.’ … The real mystery about the Enquirer, I came to find, is who actually works there. Virtually none of the articles are bylined, and it appears that Howard stopped publishing mastheads sometime in 2017. (Why? I asked Max. ‘Because it’s junk,’ he replied. ‘Why would you want to be associated with that?’) Technically, as Robertson supervises most of the newsroom, the Enquirer’s editor in chief is a veteran AMI employee named Dan Dolan. He is also editor of the Examiner and the Globe. I didn’t learn much about Dolan, except that he assumed control after Howard moved into podcast-land and, according to a non-Max ex-staffer, that he is known to carry a massive knife around the office, apparently for protection.”  Columbia Journalism Review: What happened to the National Enquirer after it went all in for Trump?

Seconded

“We can really make a difference and not only grow ourselves but help our community grow closer together. I know that after I’m gone and graduated, I want to be able to pick up a copy of The Cougar Claw somewhere that’s not a high school.” The Cougar Claw, Kearns High School’s student-run newspaper, is filling a void in its community. (The Salt Lake Tribune)

TGIF

December is the month of lists: Christmas lists, resolution lists, naughty and nice lists, mailing lists… I rest my case. But one genre of lists has a very special December in store. Year-end lists have turned to steroids, morphing into Decade-enders as we approach the Year of Vision Care, 2020. To get you started, The Hollywood Reporter’s “10 Best TV Shows of the Decade”: “Leslie Knope’s Pawnee was a town awash in impediments and complications and even her co-workers presented speed bumps aplenty. Yet the series carried along with the profound belief that people, working together, can make things better for each other and for the world. The decade surely didn’t lack for dark and tormented shows, so let’s top this list with one that’s full of hope and heart and humor.” (A list after my own heart.)

. . . “A Visit From the Goon Squad” (Yes…) is Entertainment Weekly’s book of the decade (YES!)

. . . Taylor Swift is music’s Artist and Woman of the Decade — or for Gen Z Swifties, that of their lifetime (and of their “Finstagrams”)

. . . Speaking of lists: Does the character get their story? Are they competent? Are they ethical? How believable is the journalist? The Ringer’s “Exhaustive Ranking of Movie Journalists” (24. Jim Carrey as Bruce Nolan in Bruce Almighty)

#MillennialProblems

This 30-second Peloton commercial is driving people crazy. Why? “It’s probably some combination of overacting, cheesy background music and a plot about a husband gifting his gorgeous, in-shape wife a $2,000+ exercise bike to help her get even more in-shape.” (Ad Age)

. . . “Ma’am, are you okay? ARE YOU OKAY, MA’AM?” and 48 other questions about the “disturbing Peloton Christmas commercial” (Uproxx)

Sports!

“There is not much more any of them can do. The phone and the internet were cut off months ago. There is still power, although they try not to use it because they know the bill is overdue. The only heat comes from a portable gas canister a fan brought down a few weeks ago. It has been placed next to Joan. ‘He said to tell him when the gas runs out, and he’ll replace it,’ she said.” Why do five employees keep showing up to work every day without pay for a soccer club that’s dead? The New York Times soccer writer Rory Smith asked.

Thinking ahead

After two years away, Jay-Z has released his entire discography back to Spotify. (As my brother’s Twitter bio says, “Life is for living, not living without your entire music library on Spotify.”) Happy listening…

This also happened last week: Katy Perry and Santa got couples massages from reindeer in a video for her new song, “Cozy Little Christmas,” which will not make the cut for my Christmas party playlist.

I’m the one that found all those birds’ nests: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

Fresh Powder is taking the next two weeks off. We’ll be fully decked out in a Santa costume when we return. Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

The lede

“It’s not fake news but it’s not exactly what we want people to be consuming either.” A growing network of close to 40 websites posing as local news outlets have popped up all over Michigan to push politically-slanted information, the Lansing State Journal originally reported.

. . . These websites have also shown up in, at least, Iowa, Montana, Maryland and Florida. The Michigan Daily traced the history of the operation, setup by one guy for the same politically-motivated purpose whose been rebranding his corporation over again every time it’s found out. “It’s one thing to have a blog that explicitly states a person’s opinions and viewpoints, it’s another thing to make a politically targeted message under the guise of journalism.”

. . . Other recently-discovered fake local news sites aren’t motivated by political beliefs; rather, they’re driven by potential advertising revenue and ad networks like Google’s aren’t doing a good enough job policing them. “It’s a license to pretend, and to print money”: BuzzFeed News

Seconded

“Unlike the self-consciously transgressive byproducts of Gen-X ‘serial killer culture,’ this murder was okay to post about on Facebook, or to discuss openly with coworkers. This murder came with a pledge-drive tote bag.” AV Club: “Serial didn’t invent true crime, but it did legitimize it”

TGIF

Last week, I delivered a couple links on the early feedback for two of the marquee Apple TV Plus shows, “The Morning Show” and “Dickinson.” One of those — at least, on my social feeds — has sustained an overwhelmingly positive narrative. Whether or not that has absolutely everything to do with my personal Hailee Steinfeld fandom … yes. Even so, “Dickinson” has garnered such praise for being unapologetically unique-slash-insane. “Dickinson is both stranger and more charming than any historically-revisionist show about a badass, twenty-something incarnation of Emily Dickinson has any right to be.” (The New Republic)

. . . Did you already forget about Apple TV Plus?

#MillennialProblems

“We can feel its gnostic effects on our everyday reality, but we rarely see it, and it’s quite inscrutable to non-initiates.” Slate lists “The Lines of Code That Changed Everything.” (Sorry, amateurs: There’s no Da Vinci, Pass or even Red on this list.)

Sports!

Mary Cain was the fastest girl in America, at 17, and then she joined Nike — and they destroyed her. Listen to her story, in her own words, in The New York Times’ “Equal Pay” video series, which continues to be excellent.

Thinking ahead

The entire scholastic journalism world is descending on Washington D.C. next week… in the middle of impeachment hearings. (Exactly as NSPA/JEA planned it.)

This also happened last week: The Freedom of the Press Foundation is partnering with the Internet Archive to preserve the archives of journalists at Splinter and Deadspin that might otherwise be at risk of being deleted. Pretty cool.

What is black and white and red all over: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

Sorry we ditched you last week. (Needed to freshen up.) Here’s what we missed:

The lede

“Boom. I press it,” or President Trump’s in-depth analysis of his tweeting process, reminds me of the phrase “Eat it,” which a friend and I used to yell at classmates in elementary school P.E. after we chucked a dodgeball or spiked a volleyball at someone’s head. I was 11, the dodgeballs were foam and we only played maybe once a month. Trump is the president of the United States and he tweeted 271 times during the second week of October. In an incredible three-part collaboration of journalism, The New York Times explains, with visual aids, “How Trump Reshaped the Presidency in Over 11,000 Tweets”

. . . I love a good journalism how-it’s-made. Times Insider went there on its Trump Tweets story: “Doing a data analysis without actually reading the content of the tweets wasn’t going to give us the kind of detail that we needed.” (Also: This is literally the dark web.)

Seconded

“Unfortunately, the effort to destroy (Katie) Hill was just beginning. On October 24th, the Daily Mail published more intimate photos … At that point, the damage against Hill’s reputation had been done,” and she resigned three days later. Rolling Stone: Gawker Got Shut Down for Posting a Sex Tape. Why Can the ‘Daily Mail’ Publish Nudes of Katie Hill?

TGIF

Facebook rolled out Facebook News last week, which I wouldn’t have known without Twitter. The basics, from The New York Times: “The product is a new section of the social network’s mobile app that is dedicated entirely to news content, which the company is betting will bring users back to the site regularly to consume news on sports, entertainment, politics and tech.” (Zuck’s maybe not a betting man…)

. . . What about my News Feed? “Facebook News is something else. It will rely on a team of journalists, employed by Facebook, who will highlight stories from other, human-run news organizations that Facebook is vouching for. You know, like a newspaper,” writes Peter Kafka, for Recode. (In other words, your two crazy aunts will continue bombarding your News Feed with fake news.)

. . . IMAGINE HITTING “CAPS LOCK” THE NEXT TIME YOU WRITE YOUR NAME AND CALLING IT A REBRAND: From the geniuses at FACEBOOK

#MillennialProblems

Vox: A new study reveals why female journalists are so much less influential on Twitter than men. On the ramifications: “It’s hard to argue that deciding not to tweet at someone is as bad as male members of Congress opting never to take private meetings with female staff, but it sets women up the same way. When women are excluded from the informal customs that advance careers, they’re left behind.”

Deadspin!

“For a lot of people, blogging seems simple, basically unskilled, something any borderline-literate schmuck could achieve, and separated from “real” journalism, even when the membrane is vanishingly thin.” It’s not true, of course; at least, not at the good ones — like Deadspin, until its executives decided their bloggers were all, as the nasty old stigma goes, replaceable. “When media executives are forced to take on that job themselves, following a series of extraordinary self-created crises, they don’t seem to last very long.” (VICE)

. . . Refusing new ownership’s directive to “stick to sports,” several Deadspin writers published blogs like this, and then promptly quit en masse. The New York Times, on how it all unfolded. (And how’s the site been running since then? The only “person” publishing stories to it is an author named “Deadspin.”)

. . . Here’s the leaked company memo that started everything, from The Daily Beast

. . . Your friendly neighborhood reminder of the other great websites at risk of having the same thing happen, simply because G/O Media owns them, too.

. . . “It has come to my attention that everyone is quitting,” host Molly Fischer starts out. Though it doesn’t make any direct links to Deadspin, the weekly podcast “The Cut on Tuesdays” was very much on time in asking, “How do you know when it’s time to quit?”

Thinking ahead

Apple TV+ released its first set of shows, each carrying more weight than usual: To subscribe to another streaming service, or not to subscribe? That is the question. Here’s what Rolling Stone’s Alan Sepinwall said about the “The Morning Show” and Vulture on “Dickinson,” the latest Hailee Steinfeld vehicle.

This also happened last week: Halloween.

It’s a bear dance: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

In Ann Arbor, Mich., it’s been a decade since the local daily newspaper shut down and The Michigan Daily, the university’s daily student newspaper, assumed the role. “We’ve been given this mantle of holding the powerful accountable, five nights a week, with no department backing us up. It’s a huge responsibility.” The New York Times followed those student journalists, biking through literal rainstorms and figurative hurricane-force course loads to keep their city’s residents informed, challenged, too, by, “the temporary nature of their positions. Unlike their professional counterparts, student reporters and editors learn on the job, and they invariably move on after a few semesters, well before developing sources or truly understanding the complexities of their beat, whether City Hall or the financial markets.” (College journalists are rock stars.)

Seconded

“The chances seemed high that Romney, a known family man, would want to keep close tabs on his offspring. And as luck would have it, Romney has plenty of offspring. Not all of his five sons have public Twitter accounts, and some of them, like the dreaded Tagg, have too many followers to possibly dig through. Romney’s oldest grandchild, Allie Romney Critchlow, however, has just 481 followers, making digging through them an annoying-but-not-impossible feat.” And so, the search for Mitt Romney’s secret Twitter account was born. Slate found it.

TGIF

“In a perfect world, creating the podcast would be their full-time jobs, and it’d pay like it, too. ‘But if we were unable to do that without tipping into a balance of enough listeners that it stops feeling like the community that it is,’ Marshall says, ‘Then I wouldn’t be so crazy about that.’” In the Columbia Journalism Review: “Can a ‘nobody’ make a popular, financially stable podcast?” (Or: The existential question that keeps me up at night.)

#MillennialProblems

What are they teaching kids in schools these days? High schools across the country are endorsing TikTok by sponsoring student-led clubs for it. “We’re thinking this is possibly the new Schoolhouse Rock.” (The New York Times)

. . . “TikTok Girls Dance to Audio of Toxic Exes’ Rants in Latest Darkly Funny (and Empowering) Trend” (Rolling Stone)

Sports!

Maven, the company that bought and gutted Sports Illustrated, “does not have sufficient resources to fully fund its business operations through June 30, 2020,” a report in Fortune detailed this week. “Moving forward, the company will need a ‘significant’ amount of additional capital and even that would produce no guarantee the business is self-sustainable.”

Thinking ahead

Mal and Jason are back in our lives this week with the first of their “Binge Mode: Star Wars” podcast series. May the Force be with them.

This also happened last week: Speaking of “Star Wars,” “The Rise of Skywalker” movie trailer was released Monday, coinciding with the Fall of Darnold.

It’s all still unfolding: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

For the second time in as many weeks, a changeover in ownership is preceding the shakedown of a significant journalistic institution — only, unlike at Sports Illustrated, this one is going to take several years to finish. Poynter: “Is USA Today’s print edition headed for the sunset as GateHouse and Gannett merge? Signs point to yes.”

Seconded

“I just decided to take this as an opportunity to show you guys how the songs sounded when I first wrote them.” Taylor Swift’s Tiny Desk Concert has arrived.

TGIF

“She recently posted an image of herself eating a grilled cheese alone in her room, with a screengrab from a YouTuber she didn’t know, who was eating a whole plate of grilled cheeses. ‘I’ll eat my meal with someone else eating, but we don’t know each other,’ she says. ‘That was sort of my idea, two people who aren’t aware of each other, sharing this meal together, from their rooms, alone.’” The AtlanticWhy the New Instagram It Girl Spends All Her Time Alone

#MillennialProblems

Where to go for breaking fashion news: Instagram. “There are thousands of accounts on Instagram devoted to the branding and pricing of celebrity wares. Many of them are run by teenagers. Now a cottage industry has emerged, spurring fierce competition between friends and fellow admirers who want to get the word out first.” Are ‘Closet Accounts’ the Future of Fashion Journalism? (The New York Times)

Sports!

From The New York Times, I’m Michael Ba—(record scratch sound). Mina Kimes will host ESPN’s new morning podcast. (The Washington Post) “We’re going to do investigative stories — but there should be room for joy and passion, and I think that’s what makes sports different generally and also the podcast.”

. . . Oh, you don’t know Mina Kimes? Now you do.

Thinking ahead

Tiger Woods is writing a memoir. (But to what length is he really willing to memoir it?)