It’s all still unfolding: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

For the second time in as many weeks, a changeover in ownership is preceding the shakedown of a significant journalistic institution — only, unlike at Sports Illustrated, this one is going to take several years to finish. Poynter: “Is USA Today’s print edition headed for the sunset as GateHouse and Gannett merge? Signs point to yes.”

Seconded

“I just decided to take this as an opportunity to show you guys how the songs sounded when I first wrote them.” Taylor Swift’s Tiny Desk Concert has arrived.

TGIF

“She recently posted an image of herself eating a grilled cheese alone in her room, with a screengrab from a YouTuber she didn’t know, who was eating a whole plate of grilled cheeses. ‘I’ll eat my meal with someone else eating, but we don’t know each other,’ she says. ‘That was sort of my idea, two people who aren’t aware of each other, sharing this meal together, from their rooms, alone.’” The AtlanticWhy the New Instagram It Girl Spends All Her Time Alone

#MillennialProblems

Where to go for breaking fashion news: Instagram. “There are thousands of accounts on Instagram devoted to the branding and pricing of celebrity wares. Many of them are run by teenagers. Now a cottage industry has emerged, spurring fierce competition between friends and fellow admirers who want to get the word out first.” Are ‘Closet Accounts’ the Future of Fashion Journalism? (The New York Times)

Sports!

From The New York Times, I’m Michael Ba—(record scratch sound). Mina Kimes will host ESPN’s new morning podcast. (The Washington Post) “We’re going to do investigative stories — but there should be room for joy and passion, and I think that’s what makes sports different generally and also the podcast.”

. . . Oh, you don’t know Mina Kimes? Now you do.

Thinking ahead

Tiger Woods is writing a memoir. (But to what length is he really willing to memoir it?)

What a great website: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

I bought Sports Illustrated to read it, because, as a student of sportswriting, it was the bible. TheMaven Inc., or the newest enemy of the people, bought SI to destroy it. On Thursday, The Enemy laid off 40 people, of the 160 employed at the “sports media bible,” as it plans to infuse the print and digital publication with 200 contractors (a.k.a. blog boys at cheap prices) to cover sports instead: The Wall Street Journal 

. . . “Subscribe to SI! Too late. The bad guys are in charge.” The Ringer’s Bryan Curtis on a grossly mismanaged 24 hours of lies and layoffs and why you and me and even The Athletic can do very little to stop the bleeding.

. . . This is not about journalism dying. (It isn’t). This isn’t even about the enemy big business is to journalism. (OK, maybe it is a little.) “It is about the way people think writing is dying because reading is dying, even though neither actually are … Once you could get a quick fix immediately, the value of the extra stuff that took a couple of more days diminished and eventually expired. The gift of waiting for the definitive explanation had been lost, an unintended corpse in the slaughterhouse of the new technological order.” Deadspin: “See you in hell!”

. . . “Yesterday, Sports Illustrated terminated dozens of incredible journalists who take with them a level of passion and talent for storytelling I was constantly in awe of. Some of their best work:” Robert Klemko, a football writer for SI, assembled a must-read Twitter thread.

Seconded

From Baltimore to Kenya, Turkey to China, Vietnam to South Africa and everywhere in between, BuzzFeed News shows us who our teachers are — all over the world.

TGIF

What to do when your television network bids farewell to two critically-acclaimed titles: Lock arms with Archie, Jughead, Betty and Veronica and march onward. The Ringer: “The CW is already working to expand Riverdale’s footprint beyond its narrative universe. Between ‘Batwoman’ and ‘Nancy Drew,’ the network is committed to making nostalgia staples a little bit grimmer and a whole lot sexier—a younger network’s version of CBS continuing to crank out new multicam sitcoms. Because in the face of growing uncertainty, why not stick with what works?”

. . . Betty’s ponytail returns this week. Gizmodo: “Riverdale’s Gonna Riverdale”

#MillennialProblems

“Perhaps it’s a good thing if, as Tolentino put it, young writers have since been disabused of the notion that ‘the best thing they have to offer is the worst thing that ever happened to them.’” In a culture bubbling over with bloggers, the Lena Dunhams are not the only ones who make it. (That’s a good thing.) But to what personal cost does “making it” come? For BuzzFeed News, a personal essayist looks introspectively: “Am I Writing About My Life, or Selling Myself Out?”

Sports!

The people who don’t think college athletes should be paid — or, at least, be able to profit from their name and likeness — are only thinking about how that relates to major college football and basketball. That’s a nearsighted opinion. Remember Katelyn Ohashi, the viral UCLA gymnast? She argues, for The New York Times, that California’s Fair Pay to Play Act is “about recognizing that women only receive 4 percent of coverage in all sports media and giving us the freedom to leverage sponsored deals to break through.”

. . . “A business school student at the University of Utah, junior Britain Covey recently pursued and was offered an internship in sales. Then the NCAA told the Utes wide receiver he couldn’t accept it. A compliance committee for the organization that oversees collegiate athletics nationwide told Covey the position would violate its policy on athletes prospering from the commercial use of their name, image or likeness.” (Salt Lake Tribune)

. . . Video: You have to watch this Tampa Bay Rays relay to home plate, even if you already have. (Sends a shiver down your spine, don’t it?)

Thinking ahead

Set your podcast app to Subscribe: The world’s favorite receptionist and its coldest cat parent are sitting down to rewatch “The Office,” to discuss one episode per week until the end. (Please party plan accordingly.) “Office Ladies” premieres Oct. 16.

This also happened last week: Repeat after me, “I am smart. I am blessed. I can do anything.

Swaying room as the music starts: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

We are living in a world where everyone gets their own podcast (even us), which is to say: “What started as a quiet digital backwater is now increasingly growing in prominence, drawing the attention of audiences and moneyed interests alike. In all probability, the medium is heading into a future where it firmly becomes part of the broader entertainment industrial complex. And the story of how we got here can be told via two major turning points: The first was everything that happened before and after 2014. The second turning point is happening right now.” We’re entering the era of Big Podcasting, reports Vulture.

Seconded

“They were building conversations in communities and those were the people who are breaking out. So why not apply that to our brand?” Recode: How Complex Networks CEO Rich Antoniello learned to stop worrying and love YouTube. (Or: The common answer to all SNO video support questions, “Just use YouTube.”)

TGIF

Deploying music of the time to establish setting — or what’s so beloved about shows like “Stranger Things” and “GLOW” — is the exact idea used in “Hustlers,” a movie set in a more recent time. Writes Jia Tolentino in the New Yorker, “The music, like the costuming, immerses you in the temporal setting: if you’re above a certain age, 2007 is recent enough to feel like yesterday, until you see Destiny in a bedazzled top from Bebe and hear the sound of Sean Kingston’s ‘Beautiful Girls.’” (Ahh, high school…)

. . . Sara Moonves is “The Most Watched Editor at Fashion Week” (NYT)

#MillennialProblems

“When my car turned the last switchback into the valley toward Area 51, the car radio, theretofore static, suddenly started blasting Smetana’s Má Vlast in eerie, crystal-perfect sound. The aliens, it seemed, were classical music buffs.” For The Guardian, a reporter “stormed” Area 51.

Sports!

When you need something for everyone: The Ringer is breaking down reasons to watch every single NBA team this season, one team at a time.

Thinking ahead

That collab was too good to be true. “Tedder said he was “utilizing ‘sarcasm’, ‘kidding’ and a ‘joke’ simultaneously” when he told a journalist there would be “one song featuring Beyoncé and Adele with a Chris Martin piano solo on the bridge” on OneRepublic’s forthcoming album Human.” (EW)

This also happened last week: In SNL’s season premiere, musical guest Billie Eilish danced on the ceiling, a trick made famous by Fred Astaire.

Evaporate, tall person: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“Fake News” may just be words to some, but to journalists it signals an endangering stance to protecting the free press and, specifically, the people who practice it. “The current administration has retreated from our country’s historical role as a defender of the free press,” writes the publisher of The New York Times. “Seeing that, other countries are targeting journalists with a growing sense of impunity,” putting reporters’ lives at risk. In one case, a NYT reporter in Egypt was being detained and deported in “apparent retaliation for exposing information that was embarrassing to the Egyptian government.” When the NYT protested the move and sought government help, “a senior official at the United States Embassy in Cairo openly voiced the cynical worldview behind the Trump administration’s tolerance for such crackdowns. ‘What did you expect would happen to him?’ he said. ‘His reporting made the government look bad.’” (Sheesh…) A.G. Sulzberger, in NYTThe Growing Threat to Journalism Around the World.

Seconded

“This may seem pretty self-explanatory, but people still get confused about what else can or should get published in newspapers.” The Daily Eastern News: “What is journalism?” (It’s what I studied and practiced when I was at Eastern Illinois University, home of the Eastern News.)

TGIF

In what can only be assumed was a premeditated effort to scare viewers away, Fox picked Jenny McCarthy as its host for the Emmys red carpet show on Sunday. (E! must have someone on the inside. There cannot possibly be another explanation for this.) It went as badly as you’d expect, “much to the distress of her celebrity victims.” (The Cut)

. . . The New England Patriots might have preferred McCarthy to what they faced this weekend after releasing Antonio Brown. So far, their coach walked out of his press conference Friday and stared down a sideline reporter in silence Sunday. (Bold strategy, Cotton.)

#MillennialProblems

Two #MeToo books are released around the same time. One is a clinical, excellent representation of how reporting on a complex issue happens. The other? BuzzFeed News: “Where Kantor and Twohey present the key cultural context for their reporting … that is completely devoid in the book by Pogrebin and Kelly.”

. . . “Like being hit by lightning.” BuzzFeed News on what happens to a book when it’s marked with a celebrity’s book club approval. (The ole Joan Calamezzo bump.)

Sports!

Will she or won’t she make it happen? ESPN and Katie Nolan’s little-watched, late-night variety sports talk show, Always Late with Katie Nolan, is entering its second season. “I watch John Oliver’s show and I’m like, ‘We can do that,’” Nolan told SI.

. . . While Nolan was doing that interview, Oliver’s show was sweeping the Emmys’ two Variety Talk Series categories for the fourth consecutive year.

Thinking ahead

We’ll be keeping an eye on Vox Media’s acquisition of New York Media, the company behind New York magazine, The CutVulture and more culture news sites frequently linked to in this very newsletter.

This also happened last week: “She’s here, and she’s beautiful,” says Pizza Hut of their new juiced-up Cheez-It, the glorious calzone of Cheez-Its if you will. (Coincidentally, I too am made up of 70 percent cheese, 29 percent Cheez-It and 1 percent water. Huh.)

If it’s out of a can, then nothing: this week on Fresh Powder

The lede

Since its release last week, praise poured in for the Netflix limited series Unbelievable, in which Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting is adapted for the small screen. Kaitlyn Dever portrays Marie, a real-life rape victim accused of lying. “Marie said in a recent interview that she is grateful for the Netflix series, hopeful its lessons will resonate,” updates ProPublica, which originally reported Marie’s story and others in exploring the cost of not believing victims and the failures of law enforcement.

. . . From 2016: Read the original piece by ProPublica and The Marshall Project: “An Unbelievable Story of Rape” (It would win the Pulitzer for Explanatory Reporting.)

. . . Rolling Stone: “Dramatizations that are lazy or rote can undermine the gravity of the topic and do a genuine disservice to the people who’ve suffered that real-life trauma. With Unbelievable, the creative team and superb cast treat the subject with the seriousness and grace it deserves, while also telling one hell of a story along the way.” (I highly recommend it.)

Seconded

Cokie Roberts is considered “one of a handful of pioneering female journalists … who helped shape the public broadcaster’s sound and culture at a time when few women held prominent roles in journalism.” NPR: Cokie Roberts Dies At 75.

TGIF

Netflix’s purchase of Seinfeld’s streaming rights for an incendiary sum says more about its current state of mind after losing bids to retain The Office and Friends than it does about what it thinks of Seinfeld independently. The Ringer, on these latest developments from the front lines of the escalating Streaming Wars: “Neither The Office nor Friends were Netflix originals, but they might as well have been to the binge viewers who watched them more than any in-house productions. So when those two series were set to leave Netflix, (they) were left staring down their own version of a chicken-and-egg problem: Had Netflix become a generation’s go-to because it had nostalgic touchstones from their youth, or had Friends and The Officebecome nostalgic touchstones because the service was already where millennials went for background viewing? Netflix has opted not to find out.”

. . . Alas we address the monkey in the living room: “Friends Is Older Than Some of Its Biggest Fans,” writes The New York Times. (Find someone your own age!)

#MillennialProblems

Newsrooms in MinneapolisSt. Louis and Boston handed over control of their Instagram accounts for the summer to a few college interns, resulting in huge growth, expanded reach and plentiful usage. From Poynter: “Traditionally, newsrooms have used Instagram to showcase their photographers’ work. There’s still room for that … but it’s also a way to help raise awareness of traditional journalism’s other work.”

. . . How to share traditional stories on non-traditional social media platforms to capture the attention of younger audiences is precisely what Poynter’s MediaWise is trying to figure out. “We want to presume TikTok won’t be a vehicle for publishing investigative journalism. However, given the way technology has evolved, there’s no way to tell for sure.”

Sports!

“SI conducted interviews with more than two dozen people who have employed, worked for, coached, or played alongside Brown.” In an exclusive storySports Illustrated found that there’s a lot more to the Antonio Brown story.

Thinking ahead

Where to turn to when you’re single and have exhausted all other resources: a dating doctor for your phone? Wired: “The folly of love is not so much about what we do when we are flooded with feelings, but what can happen when we have incomplete data. This is perhaps why a crop of new apps have arrived, harnessing the powers of artificial intelligence, to offer relationship advice.” (I’d have sunk $9 into it 15 years ago. Sure.)

This also happened last week: A college student’s case for Sharpay Evans, hero of the High School Musical trilogy, went viral, but for the greatest movie counter argument of all time, we give you this: Violet Beauregarde should‘ve won Wonka’s chocolate factory (Don’t @ us.)

Can you spell Gabbana: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

“The FDA is “troubled” about Juul’s marketing and outreach efforts, particularly in high schools, Sharpless said. He pointed to a testimony from a student who said that a Juul representative came into his school touting it as “much safer than cigarettes” and that the “FDA was about to come out and say it was 99% safer than cigarettes.” CNBC: Those statements, the FDA says now, are either false or unverified, and making them could be breaking the law.

. . . CNN: A sixth person died from vaping-related lung disease. Here’s what you need to know.

. . . In 1998, the reckoning came for the tobacco industry. CNN: “Joe Camel and his ilk are now in intensive care … Billboards will be coming down, and the real truth about tobacco will be available to every American.”

Seconded

Where to look when you need new bulletin board material? New York Magazine‘s Q&A with Kara Swisher. “I think most people do know when they’re good at things, and they do know their value, but then other people chip away at it,” but not Swisher, the best tech reporter on the planet and the namesake for SNO’s seventh web server.

TGIF

Thank Goodness it’s … Fashion? The Cut is writing all about the year in fashion 2009. (Still waiting for my interview request.)

#MillennialProblems

Inching us ever closer to a future sans-cable bills with 15 different streaming bills instead, Recode summarizes everything we know about the next service you’ll feel like you have to add with one important caveat: ”None of this matters at all if Apple can’t create stuff people want to watch.” (I don’t know, Dickinson feels exactly ludicrous enough to work.)

Sports!

HBO’s Hard Knocks is frequently entertaining, sometimes extraordinarily air-headed — like when it completely whiffs on the Oakland Raiders’ Antonio Brown drama. The Ringer’s Claire McNear: “These weren’t minor questions—these were the questions, for the Raiders and, to some degree, for the NFL as a whole. One of the best players in football, who has just made one of the most potentially meaningful changes of teams in the sport, might not play this season, and perhaps not ever for his new squad. And despite an NFL documentary that promised us a month and a half of unlimited access, we’re none the wiser for it.”

Thinking ahead

No dancing with aliens under the stars after all. The “Storm Area 51” music festival was canceled as organizers feared it’d be “FYREFEST 2.0.” (NBC News)

This also happened last week: The Atlantic, a Fresh Powder mainstay, announced its decision to shift to a paid online subscription modelLe sigh.

Why did the ketchup blush: this week on Fresh Powder

A summary of journalism news and pop culture brought to you by  SNO

The lede

The No. 1 true-crime podcast on the market, Crime Junkie, is facing plagiarism accusations and removed several of its episodes in response to specific charges, so far avoiding lawsuits. But is it just being picked on? Variety: “Those in the true-crime podcast world say plagiarism is rampant.” Each episode is like its own research paper, meaning it doesn’t exist if not for the work of other journalists. (But it is not unique in that.)

. . . How this plays out — perhaps, what example is made of Crime Junkie — could have broader implications for the future of policing podcasts. Poynter would argue, “complaints of stealing material are legitimate. Simply directing people to go to another place to find citations, particularly when it could be easily done in the show, is not good enough.”

Seconded

“Freed from the time requirements it takes to design and publish a newspaper,” Sacramento State University’s The State Hornet is redirecting its efforts solely to fact-checking Twitter. (Just kidding!) Its editorial board explains its decision to stop printing and start posting, after 70 years.

TGIF

The last time Fresh Powder entered your inbox, we left you with BuzzFeed’sthorough investigation into the clues about Taylor Swift’s new album. Now that “Lover” has arrived, Rolling Stone has a timeline of everything that led us to it. (Personally, it also represents a pretty accurate depiction of what I did this summer.)

. . . RS: “It feels like an epiphany: free and unhurried, governed by no one concept or outlook, it represents Swift at her most liberated.”

#MillennialProblems

What to say when your friend says “You’re just jealous” of the Kardashians: Their friendships are as manufactured as their photos are airbrushed. BuzzFeed: “Their girlfriends affirm but never outshine them, acting like a hall of mirrors, always guiding our eye back to Kim, Kylie, Kourtney, or Khloe from whom everything originates, and to which everything returns.”

Sports!

“Investors, media executives, and reporters who don’t work for the Athletic all express skepticism about the business. But almost no one will share these sentiments publicly. Who wants to be seen badmouthing one of the only places still hiring journalists? Bringing on writers for top dollar and freeing them from chasing clicks is admirable, the doubters says, but it’s no way to make money.” Very few are allowed into the factory to see how the chocolate’s made, but Bloomberg was. The findings: (Redacted)

. . . Deadspin probed deeper against the financial numbers Bloomberg published. “Mather said The Athletic is not profitable, and that tracks. Everything else … doesn’t line up as neatly.” (Ah, much more the tone of the DMs I keep with my buddies from our college paper.)

Thinking ahead

Vaping, student journalism’s topic du jour in 2018, has its 2019 legs. USA Today: CDC reports 153 possible cases of vaping-related lung illnesses, many involving THC. (Ask: How can this inform your reporting on the subject now?)

. . . Listen: Reporting on Vaping at High Schools

This also happened last week(ish): Watch this mother and son’s back-to-school parody of Lizzo’s “Truth Hurts,” rated E for Everyone.

Burning: This Week On Fresh Powder

The lede

“Ummm is this terrorism?” Surely, my wife was not the only one to send a text like that last week as you and I and the rest of the world watched the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris burning. An acknowledgement from Poynter on the day’s successful myth-debunking collaboration.

Seconded

In TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People list, an eternally-good coffee table read featuring your favorite celebs and least favorite President of the United States, one inclusion stood out: the faceless, nameless Mirian G., one of far too many parents separated from their children at the border.

…  “She has the courage of a small lion, the stamina of a Welsh pit pony and the soul of a clown.” Emilia Clarke. (She’s a total Ann Perkins.)

TGIF

If you go on the internet, you may have read about Beyonce releasing new-old content last week — a concert documentary and live album from her 2018 Coachella set. From Vanity Fair: “What made (the performances) different, as Homecoming reveals, was the intensive strain they put on Beyonce herself.

#MillennialProblems

“A great karaoke song sends waves of excitement through the audience and based on the reactions I’ve witnessed, I have a feeling we’ll be hearing ‘Shallow’ for years to come.” According to karaoke DJs, “Shallow” has not yet been overplayed.

Sports!

Meet James Holzhauer, the Jeopardy! prodigy who keeps winning unheard of amounts of money. (My Jeopardy!-watching sister-in-law says this guy’s legit.)

Thinking ahead

To April 26 and finding out what’s at the end of Taylor Swift’s countdown clock. Taylor Theorists believe she’s about to release new music and that she’s been intentionally — expertly — leaving clues for us since as early as October, despite only posting the countdown on April 13. It’s theorized that with the first clue, this Instagram picture of Taylor playing Scrabble with her mom (captioned: “Let the games BEGIN.”), posted in October, she’d already planned to post the countdown clock, six months later, on April 13 exactly because April 13 is National Scrabble Day. UN-BE-LIEV-A-BLE. (We need you now, Nicolas Cage.)

This also happened last weekThose gorillas stand up a lot like these humans I know.

Tiger, Tiger Woods, y’all: this week on Fresh Powder

Legendary CBS Sports announcer Verne Lundquist retired from everything — everything, except for this. Except for The Masters. This weekend was why. This weekend, Tiger Woods won his first major championship since 2008. What’s to follow is a collection of the best stories about the biggest sports story of this century. (Don’t even try arguing with me.)

…  SI: At Rae’s Creek, where the tournament flipped, “the sound of bells carried over the little three-hole valley, no doubt from a church somewhere nearby in Augusta — a church whose god might not have been quite so harsh as the one governing No. 12 that afternoon.

…  In being defeated by Tiger, his competitors had the best seats in the house. “Something you can’t pay for,” Tony Finau told USA Today. (Speak for yourself, Tony…) Also read: Golf Magazine has more interviews from further inside the players’ locker room.

…  “More unbelievably, he won his most recent one 14 years ago, in what now feels like another world altogether, before all those reveals of Waffle House liaisons and all the mixing of painkillers with automobiles and all the high-definition grimaces and perennial false hopes that came to define his career almost as much as his early dominance once had.” Tiger’s back in control of his own legacy: The Ringer

…  A ripple effect, as described by the Washington Post’s Barry Svrluga: “The spectators gathered by the massive, hand-operated scoreboard at the 17th green heard the roar (at the 16th) — then waited, their backs turned to the hole, waiting for Woods’ birdie to be posted … (then) exploded as if they’d seen the shot themselves. Wherever you were on the course, you knew what had happened.”

…  NYT: In a period of 14 minutes at the 12th hole, “the famous Woods intimidation factor was rejuvenated. … About 90 minutes later, it had been fully restored.”

…  SI’s cover story, plus the forthcoming cover. (There are no words.)

Seconded

Blame a hot person for stressing you out. It’s science. What happens next depends on which side of the brain is working: the Left appreciates what we see, the Right decides if we want to do anything about it. “The same thing probably happens when you look at a good painting. (The left side) can pump out the dopamine and perhaps make you slightly giddy,” but the right side stays quiet. You don’t make out with the painting. (Close one.)

TGIF

Netflix’s newest interactive, You vs. Wild, puts Bear Grylls’ life in our hands. But when you try to kill him, “A ‘replay episode’ option popped onto the screen.” Does the reality genre lose when it mixes as an interactive experience?Vulture

…  Hard as this reporter tried, Grylls couldn’t be killed. (Someone would’ve reported it by now.)

#MillennialProblems

“(Sephora), along with more than 34,000 other stores from Best Buy to Home Depot, had been using a service called the Retail Equation, which tracks customers’ returning habits via their driver’s licenses.” And Sephora has been banning the bad onesVox

Sports!

Watch Zach Johnson accidentally hit his ball during a practice swing at The Masters.

…  More Tiger: The shot at 16, the commercial Nike swiftly patched together, the gum chewing and the scoreboard at Fenway.

Thinking ahead

Kim Kardashian is studying to become a lawyer. Her sisters told Vogue it makes sense, for one, because Kim’s obsessed with true-crime programming, which just means every single one of us should be lawyers, I guess. But, hey, maybe someday she’ll prosecute Kanye for his sins. (No one explicitly said she would.)

This also happened last weekGame of Thrones went digital with an app that disseminated scripts to its actors, “and when you finished them they would magically disappear.” Meanwhile, in Oregon, the burglar was a Roomba.

Winter is coming: this week on Fresh Powder

The lede

There’s only one television show important enough infiltrate “The lede” of this news digest, and on Sunday, that show returns to us, and then six weeks later it will leave us — Game of Thrones will be gone, forever. “An era will have ended in Westeros,” Matt Zoller Seitz writes for Vulture, “And as goes Westeros, so goes TV.” So goes TV shows as appointment-viewing mega events, MZS writes. “Game of Thrones may be the last show we all watch together the way we used to.”

…  The Ringer“It’s Not Too Late to Get Into ‘Game of Thrones.’ Here’s How.” (You have five days.)

…  “Custard is frozen with packed snow harvested beyond the Wall and hand churned by members of the Night’s Watch. Final prep occurs in Winterfell, where the shake is topped with shards of Dragonglass imported from the caves of Dragonstone. Please note, supplies are limited as the Wall is currently undergoing major renovations.” (Considering the value of dragonglass, it’s so 2019 to use to as milkshake topping. Then again: milkshakes are amazing.)  Devour Game of Thrones at Shake Shack now.

…  Mental Floss13 Game of Thrones-Themed Tours You Can Take Around the World (Dragon Rides Not Included — nor possible)

Seconded

“Drug Addiction Used to End Political Careers, but That’s Finally Changing,” Vice reports.

TGIF

The Atlantic: Says one student, “The most popular post in our admission group (on Facebook) is just, ‘Comment your Instagram handle.’ Facebook is just an easy way to find people on Instagram.” (Perhaps you’d call this dance “The Facebook.”)

#MillennialProblems

Millennials Are Sick of Drinking,” says The Atlantic, “So beer is becoming more like juice,” harmonizes Vox. (Sometimes the news can be so in sync.)

Sports!

“Girls are socialized to know when they come out, gender roles are already set. Men run the world. Men have the power. … And when these girls are coming out, who are they looking up to tell them that that’s not the way it has to be? And where better to do that than in sports?” (Praise Hands emoji.) That’s just a snippet of Muffet McGraw’s comments on why she does not hire men to her Notre Dame women’s basketball staff.

Thinking ahead

BuzzFeed News: “How An Aging Population Will Reshape The Internet”

This also happened last week: “Only a skull and a pair of pants were left after a suspected rhino poacher was attacked and killed by an elephant and then devoured by lions.”